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Disability Sport Wales Child Welfare and Safeguarding Policy

Version 5, November 2022
Date for three year review: October 2025

Nathan Stephens
Nathan Stephens
Lead Safeguarding Officer
mobile 07918 716 345
email welfare@disabilitysportwales.com
address By post:
FAO: Nathan Stephens,
Disability Sport Wales Lead Safeguarding Officer,
Disability Sport Wales,
Sport Wales National Centre,
Cardiff CF11 9SW


Section 1 - Disability Sport Wales (DSW) Child Welfare and Safeguarding Policy

1.1 Key principles underpinning the DSW Child Welfare and Safeguarding Policy

Disability Sport Wales’ primary focus is to work with disabled children, young people and adults, to provide opportunity to participate, compete, coach or be coached, officiate or become an official, or work (as a volunteer or within a paid role) within (disability) sport. Evidence suggests (Working Together to Safeguard Children, 2006) that disabled children are “at increased risk of abuse and that the presence of multiple disabilities appears to increase the risk of both abuse and neglect”. It is therefore vital that those engaged in Regulated Activity with disabled children are particularly aware of the indicators of abuse, and feel confident about the processes for passing their concerns on appropriately and quickly.

DSW are committed to the fact that every (disabled) child or young person has the right to become hooked on sport for life, in an enjoyable, safe environment, and be protected from harm. Safeguarding in DSW is about ensuring that the environment is appropriate for the (disabled) child or young person, and tailored to their needs so that they have a positive experience of their sport, and do this without risk of or actual harm occurring.

DSW adheres to the following key principles which link to safeguarding:

  • the welfare of the (disabled) child is paramount
  • inclusion should occur through the provision of meaningful activity, through a process of collaborative decision-making which involved the (disabled) child or young person, their parents, guardians, carers, or personal assistants, and coaching or voluntary staff
  • appropriate communication is essential in order to ensure that everyone is equipped to deal with safeguarding issues or to safeguard themselves from harm
  • Disabled children and young people will be treated as children first – a child or young person’s impairment will not mask or deter appropriate enquiry
  • all reasonable steps will be taken to protect children from harm, discrimination and degrading treatment and to respect their rights, wishes and feelings
  • all suspicions and allegations of poor practice or abuse will be taken seriously and responded to swiftly and appropriately
  • establish partnership working with all appropriate agencies and individuals to ensure that the best outcome is achieved
  • training is essential in order to raise the awareness of those working within sport, those participating in sport, and those supporting individuals’ involvement in sport (e.g. parents/guardians, carers, etc). DSW therefore support all individuals, organisations and clubs who are members or affiliate to our organisation to attend appropriate Child Safeguard and Protection training, as well as specific Safeguarding Disabled Children training (see DSWs Training Plan for Child Welfare and Safeguarding for further information)

  • DSW has comprehensive insurance protecting its participants, coaches and staff. DSW expects all affiliated members to have an acceptable ‘live’ insurance policy in force at all times.

 

DSW will internally review its Child Welfare and Safeguarding Policy and associated toolkits in line with NSPCC guidance on an annual basis (or whenever there are amendments to relevant legislation or to best practice); and will externally review, in conjunction with the NSPCC, every 3 years. 

The review process will be led by the DSW Lead Safeguarding Officer, and supported by the DSW Deputy Safeguarding Officer, the Board Welfare Champion and members of the Case Management Panel where required.

 

1.2 Policy Aims

The aim of the policy is to keep disabled and non-disabled children safe, consistently ensure their welfare, and protect their right to a happy, positive physical activity, including sport, environment, which is free from abuse. This will be ensured through:

  • consistent engagement in good practice (Section 2: DSW Guidance to Good Practice)
  • taking the time to understand what the needs of all disabled and non-disabled children are whilst in the care of DSW. (Section 3: Understanding Child Welfare and Safeguarding Issues)
  • supporting staff and volunteers to make informed and confident responses to specific safeguarding and child protection issues (Section 4: Reacting to Child Welfare and Safeguarding Issues)
  • safe and rigorous recruitment processes for all paid and voluntary personnel working for or on behalf of DSW (Section 5: Safe Recruitment Processes)
  • an equitable approach emphasising everyone’s right to participate and compete in disability sport free from the threat of abuse regardless of their impairment, age, sex, gender, culture, language, racial origin, religious belief or sexual orientation
  • a knowledge of the right people to contact at the right time (Section 6: Important Contacts)

​​​​​

 

1.3 Legal and Procedural Framework surrounding Child Welfare and Safeguarding

The practices and procedures within this policy are based on principles contained within UK and International legislation and Government guidance.

  • The Children Act 1989 and 2004 (update: Adoption and Children’s Act 2002, update: Female Genital Mutilation Act 2019
  • The Protection of Children Act 1999
  • ‘Caring for the young and vulnerable’ Home Office guidance for preventing the abuse of trust 1999
  • Criminal Justices and Court Services Act 2000
  • The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
  • Asylum and Immigrations Act 1996
  • The Police Act 1997
  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • The Data Protection Act 1998
  • What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused 2003
  • Sexual Offences Act 2003
  • Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006
  • All Wales Child Protection Procedures 2008
  • Protection of Freedoms Act 2012
  • The Equality Act 2010
  • Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014
  • Children and Social Work Act 2017
  • Data Protection Act 2018
  • Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018
  • Children (Abolition of Defence of Reasonable Punishment) (Wales) Act 2020
     

​​​​​

1.4 Table of Appendices relevant to Section 1

Appendix Content
C1.1

Template Policy Statement

A template for clubs and organisations affiliated to Disability Sport Wales to use in creating a Child Welfare and Safeguarding Policy


Section 2 - DSW Guidance to Good Practice

2.1 Introduction

In order to provide disabled and non-disabled children and young people with the best possible experiences and opportunities in (disability) sport everyone must operate within accepted ethical frameworks, as identified in Codes of Conduct, Guidance documents, policy and legislation.

 

 

This section will help to identify what DSW and the wider Sport Sector mean by good, and poor practice.

 

2.2 Ensuring Best Practice

Disability Sport Wales expect that all those involved with delivering (disability) sport to disabled and non- disabled children and young people engage in good practice. DSW will ensure that there is access to appropriate training and support, so as to keep its coaches, volunteers, and other staff (whether involved with regulated activity or not) aware of current issues and process concerned with Child Welfare and Safeguarding.

In order to reinforce good practice, the following will be required:

  • All volunteers and paid staff working for, or on behalf of, Disability Sport Wales should adhere to the relevant DSW Code of Conduct
  • All DSW clubs should have an up-to-date Welfare Policy, and a commitment to amending it on a regular and frequent basis
  • Safe and rigorous recruitment processes are to be followed so as to ensure that personnel are appointed who pose no risk to children, young people or adults at risk (see Section 5)
  • All coaches, other volunteers, DSW member body staff, and core DSW staff who are involved with Regulated Activity with children are required to undertake a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check (which depending on role may be enhanced) through DSW. This information should be made available to DSW on a 3 yearly basis, or if an individual’s role changes. In such instances it may be that an Enhanced Check is requested (see Section 3)
  • An open and transparent process is in place to enable the reporting of concerns, provide an avenue to voice concerns, enable whistle-blowing, and ensure clear information is given in the right format to all participants, parents and carers at all times
  • Risk management processes must be adhered to when planning, delivering and reviewing sessions, activities and events (see Section 4)
  • Disciplinary, Complaints and Appeals procedures must be clearly articulated to all individuals involved with DSW, whether as a volunteer or paid member of ‘staff’, or as an athlete (see Section 4).

​​​​​

2.3 Poor Practice

The following are regarded as poor practice and should not be engaged in by any DSW personnel:

  • unnecessarily spending excessive amounts of time alone with children away from others
  • taking children alone in a car on journeys, however short, without ensuring appropriate safeguards or gaining parental consent (see Appendix C2.5)
  • taking children to your home, particularly if this means they will be alone with you
  • engaging in rough, physical or sexually provocative games, including horseplay
  • suggesting, endorsing, or not challenging any form of ‘initiation ceremony’
  • allow or engaging in inappropriate touching of any form
  • allowing children to use inappropriate language without challenge
  • making sexually suggestive comments to a child, or to an adult within the ear-shot of a child
  • reducing a child to tears as a form of control
  • allow allegations made by a child to go unacknowledged, unrecorded or not acted upon
  • do things of a personal nature that the child can do for themselves
  • not following guidelines relating to appropriate rations for staff: child/young person (see Appendix C2.6)
  • not taking an allegation made by a disabled child seriously, and dismissing for reasons you consider to be linked to their impairment​​​

If during your care you accidentally hurt a child, the child seems distressed in any manner, appears to be sexually aroused by your actions and/or if the child misunderstands or misinterprets something you have done, report such incidents as soon as possible to another colleague and make a written record of it to pass on to a senior member of staff/volunteer.

 

2.4 Physical Contact in Sport

Many sports, by their nature, require a degree of physical contact between adults and children. Physical contact can be used appropriately to instruct, encourage, protect or comfort. The aims of guidelines relating to physical contact are to provide adults and children with appropriate types and contexts.

Physical contact between adults and children should only be used when the aim is to:

  • develop sports skills or techniques
  • treat an injury
  • prevent an injury
  • meet the requirements of the particular sport
  • comfort a child or young person who is upset
  • congratulate a child or young person when they have been successful in performance
  • guide or support a disabled child or young person with a recognised need in pursuit of their sport
  • support or assist a disabled child or young person to stand or regain their balance, or to transfer into specific equipment used within the pursuit of their sport (see Appendix C2.13)


all of the above forms of contact should:

  • only occur within an open environment,
  • meet the need of the child (and NOT the need of the adult)
  • be fully explained to the child
  • only occur with permission from the individual (with the exception of in an emergency)
  • only be given if the individual has received specific training to do so​​​​​​​


Contact should NEVER:

  • be prolonged, unnecessary or frequent
  • involve touching or contact with genital areas, breasts or buttocks
  • take place in secret or out of sight of others
  • include the transfer of children or young people, unless the individual providing the transfer has received appropriate training.

Information about injuries occurring within the DSW/sport/club environment should be fully recorded. If a disabled or non-disabled child or young person arrives at the session with a pre-existing injury then this should also be recorded and mentioned to the parents/carers/guardians on collection or as appropriate.

 

2.5 Good practice guidelines relating to relationships

If a relationship between two young people (aged over 16 years), or between an adult (aged over 18) and a young person (aged over 16 years) where one or both are involved with the same DSW club, session or activity, or where there is a position of trust held by one of the individuals, the following guidelines must be observed:

  • Sexual activity between young people (over the age of 16), or between an adult and a young person (aged over 16) is not permitted when the young people/person are/is part of a DSW team, in facilities being used by DSW or on social activities organised by DSW or any organisation linked to DSW.

  • Sexual activity between two individuals where one is under the age of consent (16 years in Wales) is an illegal act; if the male is over 16 and the female is under 16 then this is sexual assault, if the female is over 16 and the male is under 16 then this is indecent assault. Therefore information relating to sexual activity occurring between two individuals where one is under the age of consent will always be passed on to the relevant authorities.

  • Coaches, leaders or anyone in any other role with DSW are in a position of trust and therefore should not engage in a sexual relationship with any young person, whether over the age of consent or not, who they work with on behalf of DSW or an organisation linked to DSW.

Failure to follow these guidelines will result in disciplinary action, and where relevant reports made to the police and/or social services.​​

 

2.6 Good Practice Guidelines for the use of Photographic/Filming Equipment at DSW Events

There is evidence that some people have used sporting events as an opportunity to take inappropriate photographs or film footage of children and young people. DSW will be vigilant and any concerns must be reported to the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare  Officer. The following will always be undertaken:

  • All parents and performers should be made aware when coaches use video equipment as a coaching aid, and parental consent should be sought before any filming or photography is done (see Appendix C2.8)
  • No video or photographic materials will be reproduced without the parents/guardians written consent (see Appendix C2.8)
  • All photographic or video recording equipment must be registered with the event organiser prior to its use (see Appendix C2.7)​​​​​
     

 

2.7 Table of Appendices relevant to Section 2

Appendix Content
C2.1

Coaches Code of Conduct
Coaches Code of Conduct (Easy Read)
Outline of the ethical framework which a DSW Coach agree to abide by.

C2.2

Athletes Code of Conduct
Athletes Code of Conduct (Easy Read)
Outline of the ethical framework which a DSW Athlete agrees to abide by.

C2.3

Parents/Carers/Guardians Code of Conduct
Parents/Carers/Guardians Code of Conduct(Easy Read)
Outline of the ethical framework which a Parent/Carer/Guardian of a DSW athlete agrees to abide by.

C2.4

Guidelines for Transporting Children and Young People
DSW recommendations for good practice when transporting children and young people.

C2.5

Parental Consent Form: Transporting Children and Young People
Consent Form for parents to sign agreeing to the transportation of child.

C2.6

Guidelines for the Supervision of Children and Young People
DSW recommendations for good practice when supervising children and young people.

C2.7

Guidelines for Photography and Recorded Images  
DSW recommendations for good practice when taking and using photographs and recorded
images of children and young people.

C2.8

Parental Consent Form: Use of Photography and Recorded Image 
Consent Form for parents to sign agreeing to the taking and use of photographs and recorded images of their child.

C2.9

Guidelines for Club Promotion through the DSW website ​​​​​​
DSW recommendations for good practice when promoting clubs for children and young people on the DSW website.

C2.10

 DSW’s Commitment to e-safety: Using Social Media and Information Technology
DSW position statement regarding e-safety and the role e-communication has within the
organisation.

C2.11

Athlete Agreement: Use of Social Media
Agreement Form for DSW athletes to sign agreeing to standards for the use of social media.

C2.12

Officers Agreement: Use of Social Media
Agreement Form for DSW Officers (coaches, volunteers or others in a position of trust) to sign agreeing to standards for the use of social media.

C2.13

Guidelines for manual handling/ supporting athlete transfer
DSW recommendations for good practice when supporting an athlete transferring or recovering into a specific piece of equipment used within

the pursuit of their sport.

Section 3 - Understanding Child Welfare and Safeguarding Issues

3.1 Defining Abuse

Abuse is any form of physical, emotional or sexual maltreatment or lack of care that leads to harm, or fails to protect a child or young person from harm. It is likely to occur where there is a relationship of trust (which may pre-exist the abuse, or have been created in order for abuse to take place, i.e. grooming) or responsibility. Abuse can happen to a child regardless of their age, gender, race or impairment; and may be perpetrated by an adult or another child, a male or a female.

There are five main types of child abuse:

  • physical abuse
  • sexual abuse
  • emotional abuse
  • neglect, and
  • bullying

The abuser may be a family member, someone the child encounters in residential care or in the community, a friend, a coach, or a stranger. Any individual may abuse or neglect a child directly, or may be responsible for abuse because they fail to prevent another person harming the child. Abuse in all of its forms can affect a child at any age. The effects can be so damaging that if not treated may follow the individual into adulthood.

Research identifies that disabled children may be at increased risk of abuse, and this may be linked to some of the following factors:

  • an increased likelihood of being socially isolated with fewer contacts outside than non-disabled children
  • an increased dependence on parents or carers for practical assistance, including intimate personal care and therefore greater exposure to abuse
  • (if living away from home, or going into respite care) a greater susceptibility to abuse because they are reliant on additional care from other people outside of the home/family environment
  • a reduced capacity to resist or avoid abuse
  • speech, language or communication impairment which may make it difficult for others to understand what is happening to them
  • an increased vulnerability to bullying and victimisation 
  • the social perception that disabled children would not be targets for abuse, and that the impact of abuse if it happens is not as devastating to a disabled child as a non-disabled child, and that a disabled child is more likely to make a false claim (Marchant, R. (1991). Myths and facts about sexual abuse and children with disabilities. Child Abuse Review, 5 (2), pp.22-24)

In sport, activities which might involve physical contact with children could potentially create situations where sexual abuse may go unnoticed. Also the power of the coach over young athletes, if misused, may lead to abusive situations developing.

 

 

 

3.2 Types of Abuse

Abuse may take place in a sport context (and be perpetrated by someone who has a role within (disability) sport), or it may be noticed within a sport context but have been perpetrated outside of the sport environment by someone who is know or unknown to the (disabled) child or young person.

 

 

3.2.1    Physical Abuse:

This involves the attempt to, or succeeding in physically hurting or injuring a child, or failing to stop someone else doing this. It can include hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, providing drugs or alcohol, burning, biting, scalding, and attempting to suffocate or drown a child or young person. This category of abuse can also include when a parent/carer reports non-existent symptoms or illness, or deliberately causes ill-health in a child they are looking after.

In a sports situation, physical abuse may occur when the nature and intensity of training disregard the capacity of the child’s immature and growing body. For disabled children this may also be a disregard for the implications of the child’s impairment, and therefore failing to accommodate this knowledge in the planning and execution of sessions.

3.2.2    Sexual Abuse

This involves the forcing or enticement of a child or young person to meet the sexual needs of an adult or another child (including prostitution), irrelevant of whether the child or young person is aware or not of what is happening. It may be perpetrated by males and females, and includes penetrative sexual intercourse (rape or buggery), masturbation, oral sex, and fondling; showing children pornography, talking in a sexually explicit manner, or encouraging the child or young person to behave or talk in a sexual manner is also sexual abuse.
 
In sport, activities which might involve physical contact with children could potentially create situations where sexual abuse may go unnoticed. Also the power of the coach over young athletes, if misused, may lead to abusive situations developing.

3.2.3    Emotional Abuse:

This involves the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child, which will then very likely cause severe and lasting adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may include telling a child they are useless, worthless, unloved, and inadequate or valued in terms of only meeting the needs of another person. It may feature expectations of children that are not appropriate to their age or development. It may cause a child to be frightened or feel to be in danger by being constantly shouted at, threatened or taunted. Maltreatment of children, whatever form it takes, will always feature a degree of emotional abuse.

Emotional abuse in sport may occur when the child is constantly criticised, given negative feedback, or expected to perform at levels that are above their capability. Other forms of emotional abuse could take the form of name calling and bullying; this may be linked to the individual’s impairment, or regarding others perceptions about what they can or can’t do as a ‘consequence’ of their impairment.

3.2.4    Neglect:

This involves the persistent failure to meet a child or young person’s basic physical and/or psychological
needs, to an extent that is likely to result in serious impairment of the child’s health or development. It can include failing to provide adequate food, shelter and clothing, failing to protect from physical harm or danger, or failing to ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It can also include a refusal to give love, affection and attention.

In sport it could involve a coach leaving a child/young person unsupervised, or exposing them to undue cold/heat or unnecessary risk of injury.

3.2.5    Bullying:

Bullying is defined as deliberate hurtful behaviour, usually repeated over a period of time, where it is difficult for those bullied to defend themselves, and may come from another child, young person or adult. There are four main types of bullying:

  • physical (e.g. hitting, kicking, pinching, slapping and other forms of physical threat or action)
  • verbal (e.g. name calling, sarcasm, spreading rumours, graffiti, threats, persistent teasing, and abusive text messages)
  • emotional (e.g. tormenting, ridiculing, humiliating, ignoring, isolating from a group),
  • racial (e.g. racist taunts, graffiti or gestures), or
  • sexual (e.g. unwanted physical contact, abusive comments, taunting or persistently making suggestive remarks).

 
In sport, bullying may arise when a parent or coach pushes the child too hard to succeed and threatens the child or young person with any of the above behaviour, or an athlete inappropriately intimidates an opponent or official, or where a group deliberately ostracise a member from activities with their sessions.​​​​​

 

3.3 Indicators of Abuse

Even for those experienced in working with child abuse, it is not always easy to recognise a situation where abuse may occur or has already taken place. Most people are not experts in such recognition, but indications that a child or young person is being abused may include one or more of the following:

  • unexplained or suspicious injuries such as bruising, cuts or burns, particularly if situated on a part of the body not normally prone to such injuries. For a child who is not ambulant this may be an injury to a site which would not be of concern on an ambulant child (such as on the shin) but which would be of concern on a non-ambulant child.

  • an injury for which an explanation seems inconsistent

  • the (disabled) child or young person describes what appears to be an abusive act involving them

  • another (disabled) child, young person or adult expresses concern about the welfare of a (disabled) child or young person

  • unexplained changes in a (disabled) child or young person’s behaviour, e.g. becoming very upset, quiet, withdrawn or displaying sudden outbursts of temper

  • inappropriate sexual awareness

  • engaging in sexually explicit behaviour

  • distrust of adult’s, particularly those whom a close relationship would normally be expected

  • difficulty in making friends

  • being prevented from socialising with others

  • displaying variations in eating patterns including over-eating or loss of appetite

  • losing weight for no apparent reason

  • becoming increasingly dirty or unkempt

  • specific equipment supplied to support the disabled child (wheelchair, callipers, walking frame) is ill fitting or damaged and remains so

  • forced immobility brought about through specific actions of the adult (or another (disabled) child), i.e. removing batteries from an electric wheelchair to restrict liberty and movement

  • misappropriate (misuse) of a (disabled) child’s finances/money

 

Signs of bullying include:

  • behavioural changes such as reduced concentration and/or becoming withdrawn, clingy, depressed, tearful, emotionally up and down, reluctance to go to training or competitions
  • an unexplained drop off in performance
  • physical signs such as stomach aches, headaches, difficulty in sleeping, bed-wetting, scratching, bruising, damaged clothes, bingeing e.g. on food, alcohol or cigarettes
  • a shortage of money or frequent loss of possessions

 

 

3.4 Table of Appendices relevant to Section 3

Appendix Content
C3.1

About the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)
Information about the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

C3.2

DSW Disclosure and Barring Service Processes
Outline of the DSW process for conducting DBS checks with staff and/or volunteers

C3.3

Guidance about Regulated Activity for Children
DBS recommendations about what is considered to be ‘Regulated Activity’

C3.4

Guidance about Eligibility for a DBS Enhanced Check
DBS recommendations about who is eligible for a DBS check

C3.5

DSW List of Eligible Roles for DBS check
DSW recommendations for those roles which meet the eligibility requirements for a DBS check associated with Regulated Activity

C3.6

DSW Anti-Bullying Policy
DSW Policy to combat and prevent bullying


Section 4 - Reacting to Child Welfare and Safeguarding Issues

4.1 Introduction

It is not the responsibility of anyone working in or on behalf of DSW, whether in a paid or unpaid capacity, to decide whether or not child abuse has taken place. However there is a responsibility to act, and pass on any concerns through contact with the appropriate authorities so that they can then make inquiries and take necessary action to protect the (disabled) child or young person. This applies BOTH to allegations/suspicions that abuse taking place elsewhere (see Appendix C4.1) and to allegations/suspicions of abuse occurring within DSW (see Appendix C4.2)

This section explains DSW’s process for responding to concerns or allegations about abuse.

 

4.2 Responding to Concerns/Allegations

Employees and volunteers may become aware of possible abuse in various ways. It may be seen happening, it may be suspected because of signs observed such as those listed in Section 3.3, it may be reported to us by someone else, or directly confirmed to us by the (disabled) child or young person affected.

In the last of these cases, it is particularly important to respond appropriately. If a (disabled) child or young person says or indicates that they are being abused, you should:

  • stay calm so as not to frighten the (disabled) child or young person

  • reassure the (disabled) child or young person that they are not to blame and that it was right to tell

  • actively listen to the (disabled) child or young person, showing that you are taking them seriously

  • keep questions to a minimum so that there is a clear and accurate understanding of what has been said. The law is very strict and child abuse cases have been dismissed where it is felt that the child has been led, or words and ideas have been suggested during questioning. Only ask questions to clarify

  • inform the child that you have to let other people about what they have told you. Tell the child this is to help stop the abuse continuing.

  • safety of the child is paramount. If the child needs urgent medical attention call an ambulance, inform the doctors of the concern and ensure they are made aware that this is a child protection issue. If there is an immediate risk to the child, then call the police

  • record all information

  • report the incident to the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare  Officer, the Club Welfare Officer, or directly to social services if necessary

 

4.3 Recording Information

To ensure that information is as helpful as possible, a detailed record should always be made at the time of the disclosure/concern being observed (see Appendix C4.8 and C4.9). In recording you should confine yourself to the facts, if you have additional information you need to distinguish this and identify that as personal knowledge and hearsay. Do not include your own opinions.

Information should include the following:

  • the (disabled) child or young person’s name, age and date of birth
  • the (disabled) child or young person’s home address and telephone number
  • whether or not the person making the report is expressing their concern or someone else’s
  • the nature of the concerns/allegations, including dates, times and any other relevant information
  • a description of any visible bruising or injury, location, size etc. Also any indirect signs, such as behavioural changes
  • details of any witnesses to the incidents or to the disclosure, allegation or concern raised
  • the (disabled) child or young person’s account, if it has been given, of what has happened and how any bruising/injuries occurred
  • information about contact with the parents, and what has been said
  • details of any third person or party consulted, and what information was given and received
  • If names were mentioned in the allegation or concern make sure these are recorded

If you have witnessed or been informed of an incident which is considered to be poor practice or a breach of the Code of Conduct for that role, then complete Appendix C4.10. This form should be returned to the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer.

 

4.4 Reporting the Concern

All suspicions and allegations MUST be reported appropriately. It is recognised that strong emotions can be present when dealing with issues linked to abuse. It is important to understand these feelings but not allow them to interfere with your judgement about any action to take. Your primary role is to pass information about the allegation, observation or disclosure on.

Your only loyalty is to the (disabled) child or young person involved.

The DSW expects its members, volunteers and staff to discuss any concerns they may have about the welfare of a (disabled) child or young person immediately with the person in charge, or the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer, and subsequently to check that appropriate action has been taken.

If the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer or the nominated club welfare officer is not available you should take responsibility and seek advice from the NSPCC Helpline, the duty officer at your local social services department, or the police. Telephone numbers can be found in your local directory.

Where there is a complaint against an employee or volunteer, there may be three types of investigation.

  • Criminal in which case the police are immediately involved
  • Child protection in which case the social services (and possibly) the police will be involved
  • Disciplinary or misconduct in which case DSW will be involved. For further information about these processes see Appendix C4.11 or C4.12 (depending on role)

Children’s services have a legal responsibility under The Children Act 1989 and 2004 to investigate all child protection referrals by talking to the (disabled) child and family (where appropriate), gathering information from other people who know the (disabled) child and making inquiries jointly with the police. This process is led by the Local Safeguarding Children Boards, who’s remit it is to ensure that effective policies and working practices are in place in order to safeguard children, and to co-ordinate the partnership working of those members represented on the group (i.e. chief of police, director of social services, chief education officer, probation board chief officer, youth offending team manager, local health board lead, Health Trust lead, etc). They will also deal with serious case reviews.

For further information and contact details about Local Safeguarding Children Boards please see: https://gov.wales/reporting-suspected-abuse-harm-or-neglect-safeguarding

 

 

The process for reporting any allegation or concern that a (disabled) child or young person has been abused by a DSW member of staff or volunteer can be found in Appendix C4.2. The sequence of action DSW will follow in dealing with that information is illustrated in Appendix C4.5.

Where an allegation or concern has been identified within a DSW session that a (disabled) child or young person has been abused by an individual outside of DSW the process is identified in Appendix C4.1. The sequence of action DSW will follow in dealing with that information is illustrated in Appendix C4.6.

Allegations of abuse are sometimes made some time after the event. Where such an allegation is made, you should follow the same procedures as for a child protection concern happening now. Anyone who has a previous conviction for offences related to abuse against children is automatically barred from working with children/young people (their name would appear on the Children’s Barred List). 

For information about who to contact within the Local Authority, and other information regarding All Wales Child Protection procedures, see:

 

4.5 Whistle Blowing/Provision of Information Relating to ‘Colleagues’

DSW have a procedure which enables staff and volunteers to share, in confidence with a designated person, concerns they may have about a colleague’s behaviour (see Appendix C4.15).

This may be behaviour linked to child abuse or behaviour that pushes boundaries beyond acceptable limits. If this is consistently ignored a culture may develop within an organisation whereby staff and young people are ‘silenced’. DSW is fully supportive of Whistle Blowing/Provision of information relating to ‘colleagues’ for the sake of the child, and will provide support and protect the identity of the individual/s who ‘whistle blow’.

Whilst it is difficult to express concerns about colleagues, it is important that these concerns are communicated to the designated person. All staff and volunteers will be encouraged to talk to the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer if they become aware of anything that makes them feel uncomfortable.

 

4.6 Concerns outside the immediate Sporting Environment (e.g. a parent or carer)

It is vital that any concerns regarding child/young person are passed on to agencies who can effectively intervene and assist. Therefore even if the concerns/allegations relate to a situation outside of the immediate sporting environment, report your concerns to the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer (see Appendix C4.1). If the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer is not available, the person being told or observing the potential abuse should contact the DSW CEO , their local social services department or the police immediately. Social Services and the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer will decide how to inform the parents/carers. The DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer will inform the DSW Internal Independent Verifier, who will convene the DSW Case Management Panel, and report the issue to them. The DSW Case Management Panel will determine whether or not the person/s involved in the incident plays a role in the organisation and act accordingly (see Appendix C4.4).

Further detail is available about this process for passing on concerns, or disclosures; please see Appendix C4.4, Appendix C4.5, and Appendix C4.6.

 

4.7 Confidentiality

Every effort should be made to ensure that confidentiality is maintained for all concerned. Information should be handled and disseminated on a need to know basis only. This includes the following people:

  • The DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer, orCEO, (where appropriate)
  • The parents of the child
  • The person making the allegation
  • Children’s and/or Social Services
  • The Police (if involved)
  • The alleged abuser (and parents if the alleged abuser is a minor)

 All information is stored in a secure place, a locked filing cabinet or a password protected electronic area, with access limited to designated people, in line with data protection laws (see Appendix C4.16 for guidance about how DSW store any Welfare case or referral information).

 

4.8 Internal Inquiries and Suspension

(see Appendix C4.11 (DSW employee) OR Appendix C4.12 (DSW Athlete)

The DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer in conjunction with the DSW CEOand the Internal Independent Verifier will make an immediate decision about whether the individual about whom the concern was raised or the referral or disclosure identified should be temporarily suspended pending further inquiries.

All organisations have a legal duty to refer individuals to the DBS who have:

  • harmed or poses a risk of harm to a child or vulnerable adult;
  • satisfied the harm test; or
  • received a caution or conviction for a relevant offence

If, after following the DSW Internal Safeguarding Procedures identified in Appendices C4.4 and C4.5, there is a duty to refer an individual to the Disclosure and Barring Services (DBS), the form provided in C4.17 should be completed and sent to the DBS.

All further decision making will be taken by the DSW Case Management Panel. The constitution of this panel is identified in Appendix C4.4. This appendix also identifies the process leading up to, and occurring within and after the Case Management Panel.

 

4.9 Working with the Aftermath

After a concern or allegation about a child protection issue has been investigated, there is likely to be strong feelings amongst staff, parents and children and possibly among the wider community, which will need to be addressed.

There are likely to be issues of:

  • Communication - if rumour or fact
  • Guilt and blame - if suspicions had been around for some time
  • Impact - on individuals, or the nature of what occurred and to whom
  • Gaps in the organisation in terms of roles and post held – if suspension or dismissal has occurred

Careful thought will need to be given to the sharing of information and the provision of appropriate support.
 

4.9.1        Supporting the Club

Staff at DSW understands the impact a suspicion or allegation about a child protection concern may have on a club/organisation. DSW will support the club/organisation during the aftermath by:

  • Allocating an individual within DSW who will act as a point of contact for the club/organisation
  • DSW will make every effort to work with the club/organisation to ensure that the regular activities of the club/organisation experience as little disruption as possible
  • Should it be required, DSW will support the club/organisation in providing as much information on the allegation or suspicion as is appropriate and relevant, this may include information session for parents/carers/other club members
  • DSW would support the club/organisation with any enquiries from external organisations/agencies in relation to the (alleged) ‘incident’
  • DSW will give consideration to any request for information from a club/organisation in relation to the (alleged) ‘incident’

 

4.9.2        Managing the Media

Any media enquiries either related directly or indirectly to an incident involving a child/young person will automatically be referred to the Executive Director who will, in conjunction with the DSW Board of Directors, determine whether a response should be made and if so, what information should be released.

 

4.10 Monitoring incidences and complaints

Once an incident has been reported, or a complaint has been received, the treatment of these will be monitored, recorded and evaluated in order to ensure that all incidents/complaints are dealt with, that best practice takes place, and that the DSW Welfare and Safeguarding Policy and Processes continue to be fit-for-purpose and reflective of the (disability) sport landscape in Wales. This monitoring process is identified in Appendix C4.7.

 

4.11 Table of Appendices relevant to Section 4

Appendix Content
C4.1

Responding to concerns about individuals outside of DSW ​​​​​​
DSW process which MUST be followed if there are concerns that some OUTSIDE of DSW has abused or has been alleged to abuse a child or young person attending a DSW session.

C4.2

Responding to concerns about a member of DSW staff or volunteer 
DSW process which MUST be followed if there are concerns that a DSW member of staff or volunteer has abused or has been alleged to abuse a child or young person.

C4.3

Responding to concerns about an e-safety incident

DSW process which MUST be followed if there are concerns about an e-safety incident.
C4.4

DSW Internal Safeguarding Procedures: Risk Management Process

DSW process highlighting training requirement through to responding to an issue raised within the DBS check.
C4.5

DSW Internal Safeguarding Procedures: Responding to an allegation made about a Coach or Volunteer within a DSW session 

The process DSW will apply in responding to an allegation received through the DSW Lead Welfare Officer about a coach or volunteer involved with a DSW session.
C4.6

DSW Internal Safeguarding Procedures: Responding to an allegation made about an individual outside of a DSW session
The process DSW will apply in responding to an allegation received through the DSW Lead Welfare Officer about a individual who is not associated with a DSW session.

C4.7

DSW Incidents and Complaints Monitoring Process 

DSW process for monitoring incidents and complaints.
C4.8

Incident Report Form

Template form which outlines the key elements of information which should be provided or captured by an individual receiving a disclosure or allegation.
C4.9

e-Safety Incident Report Form
Template form which outlines the key elements of information which should be captured if there is an incident, or poor practice linked to e-technology or social media.

C4.10

Poor Practice Referral Form

Template form which outlines the key elements of information which needs to be identified if there is a suspicion or report of poor practice within the coaching environment or session.
C4.11

DSW Welfare Discipline and Dispute Resolutions Procedures (Officer)

Discipline and dispute resolution policy for those employed or deployed by DSW.
C4.12

DSW Welfare Discipline and Dispute Resolutions Procedures (Athlete)

Discipline and dispute resolution policy for athletes.
C4.13

DSW Welfare Lead Officer/DSW Safeguarding Panel Referral Form 
Template form to be completed by the DSW LWO or the Safeguarding Panel which records the key points of the DSW Safeguarding Panel discussion and identifies the chain of

communication on to appropriate individuals or bodies.
C4.14

DSW Whistle Blowing Policy

DSW Whistle Blowing Policy which can be evoked if an individual believes that a member of DSW staff is behaving inappropriately.
C4.15

Lead Officer Referral/Disclosure Report From

Form to be used by the DSW Lead or Associate Lead Welfare Officer when receiving information about referral or disclosure.
C4.16

Guidance for storing Welfare case or referral information

Information for Lead Welfare Officer regarding the processes for storing information which links to a Welfare case or referral, in accordance with Data Protection legislation.
C4.17

Making a Referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

Form created by the DBS for organisations who have a legal duty to refer an individual to the DBS.

Section 5 - Safe Recruitment Processes

5.1 Introduction

It is important that all reasonable steps are taken to prevent unsuitable people from working with children. The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 identifies that it is illegal to recruit someone to work with children or young people if they have committed an offence which results in them being put on the

Children’s List. This applies to paid staff and volunteers, both full and part time. It is important to note that DSW use the Disclosure and Barring Services check as a part of safe recruitment processes NOT as a standalone method.

DSW have a detailed and coherent Recruitment Policy (see Appendix C5.1). The information included in this section summarises the key points of the Recruitment Policy.

To ensure DSW only recruit suitable people into their roles, the following steps are taken when recruiting:

  • All staff will be recruited into DSW roles and posts are appointed based on their suitability against a predefined Job Description. For those who are involved with regulated activity the job descriptions are very specific (see Appendix C5.7, Appendix C5.8, and/or Appendix C5.9)
  • All staff and volunteers should complete a Self Disclosure Form (see Appendix C5.11)
  • All staff and volunteers should complete an application form (see Appendix C5.3). The application form will elicit information about the applicants past and a self-disclosure about any criminal record
  • Two confidential references will be taken up from previous employers (see Appendix C5.4). If the potential employee has previously worked with children then they should enclose a reference from this organisation. These references WILL be taken up and confirmed through telephone contact from the referee.
  • Evidence of identity (passport or driving licence with photo) which will be seen when the DBS check is completed.

 

5.2 Interview and Induction

All employees and volunteers will be required to undertake an interview carried out to acceptable protocol and recommendations. All employees and volunteers will receive a formal staff induction during which:

  • A check is made that the applications details provided on the application form are corrected and were completed in full (including sections on criminal records and self-disclosures – see Appendix C5.11)
  • The applicant will be asked for certification of all qualifications referred to on their application form and/or within the interview. In circumstances where certification is not available, these qualifications and awards will be ratified with the awarding body.
  • The job requirements and responsibilities are clarified, and role description revisited
  • The applicant will commit to complying with DSW standards for behaviour, ethics and standards identified within the Staff Handbook which will be discussed in full
  • Welfare procedures are explained and training needs identified, i.e. child welfare training
  • A DBS application form will be completed if the applicant is going to be employed into a role which DSW has identified as being eligible for receipt of a check
  • DSW apply a six month probationary period to all new appointments. Progress and performance against the essential characteristics of the role (as identified in the personal specifications) will determine whether the probation period is extended, or whether the probationary period is confirmed and the member of staff made permanent.

 

 

5.3 Training

In addition to pre-selection checks, the safeguarding process includes training after recruitment to help staff and volunteers to:

  • Analyse their own practice against what is deemed best practice, and to ensure their practice is likely to protect them from false allegations
  • Recognise their responsibilities and report any concerns about suspected poor practice and/or abuse
  • Respond to concerns expressed by a child/young person or adults at risk
  • Work safely and effectively with children/young people or adults at risk

DSW requires:

  • All staff and volunteers who occupy roles within regulated activity to apply for an enhanced DBS check (these roles are identified within Appendix C3.4)
  • All employees, volunteers, coaches, welfare officers and team managers to undertake relevant child protection training or undertake a form of home study, to ensure their practice is exemplary and to facilitate the development of positive culture towards best practice and the welfare and safeguarding of child/young person and adults at risk
  • All staff and volunteers to receive advisory information outlining best/poor practice and informing them what to do if they have concerns about the behaviour of an adult towards a child/young person or adult at risk
  • All coaches, trainee coaches and leaders should have an up-to-date first aid qualification, and would be strongly encouraged to attend welfare and safeguarding training

 

5.4 Implementation and Monitoring

It is mandatory that all staff, coaches and volunteers receive training on the Welfare Policy. A copy of the policy will be made available to all staff, coaches and volunteers, and is available under the Welfare section of the DSW website. The Child Welfare and Safeguarding Policy will be reviewed annually by the DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer, in conjunction with the DSWCEO , the Board Welfare Champion, and members of the Case Management Panel (as appropriate), and will be signed off by the Board of Directors and made available to Sport Wales, and colleagues working on behalf of the NSPCC. The DSW Lead Safeguarding/Welfare Officer will report to the DSW Board Welfare Champion prior to each DSW Board meeting, and the DSW Safeguarding Standards Implementation Plan will be monitored and challenge through this Board member.

5.4.1 Monitoring of DSW and DSW Website Content

DSW recognises that as an organisation working with other partners clubs, agencies, and organisations (who may not be affiliated to DSW), and in some cases advertises the availability of clubs and sporting opportunities for disabled people through its website on behalf of other organisations; that there is a

responsibility on DSW’s part to attempt to ensure that such clubs meet minimum Child Welfare and Safeguarding standards. Therefore each club, organisation or sporting opportunity that is ‘advertised’ on the DSW websites will need to have received the insport Club Ribbon standard. This identifies that the club have attained robust, safe and inclusive minimum operating standards, and therefore DSW have increased confidence that (disabled) children and young people will gain a positive sporting experience.

5.4.2 Monitoring of DSW recruitment processes

All recruitment processes will be monitored through in the following ways:

  • Questionnaire follow-up with appointed individuals regarding the process, support, and practices within their recruitment experience at the DSW
  • Comparison of the DSW processes, practices and policies against those of other similar UK organisations, and other NGBs within Welsh sport
  • Checking the currency of policy and procedure against legislation and guidance relating to safe, equitable recruitment practices
  • Sign off of policy through the DSW legal advisors, Dolmans
  • Endorsement and sign off of the Recruitment Policy on an annual basis by the DSW Board

 

5.5 Responsibility

It is the responsibility of all staff involved with recruitment processes to ensure that best practice is observed throughout the advertising, appointment and induction of all new staff to DSW; and to ensure that they are appropriately prepared and skilled in areas of recruitment practices and equal opportunities. Ultimate responsibility for the currency, appropriateness and application of DSW Recruitment Policy rests with the Executive Director of DSW.

 

5.6 Table of Appendices relevant to Section 5

Appendix Content
C5.1

DSW Recruitment Process
Cyclical representation of the process DSW apply to recruitment

C5.2

DSW Recruitment Policy

This is DSW’s full Recruitment Policy
C5.3

DSW Application Form

This will receive if they request the opportunity to apply for a position with DSW
C5.4

DSW Reference Form

This will be sent out to the contact the candidate supplies as a reference for previous employment or who will attest to their character and suitability for the position applied for.
C5.5

Job Description – DSW Lead Welfare Officer 
Role description for the DSW Lead Welfare Officer

Job Description – DSW Associate Lead Welfare Officer

Role description for the DSW Associate Lead Welfare Officer
C5.6

Job Description – DSW DBS Countersignatory

Role description for individuals involved with countersigning DBS checks
C5.7

Job Description – DSW Head Coach

Role description for head coaches employed/deployed by DSW
C5.8

Job Description – DSW Assistant Coach / Leader

Role description for assistant coaches/leaders employed/deployed by DSW
C5.9

Job Description – DSW Head Junior Coach

Role description for head junior coaches employed/deployed by DSW (relevant to those coaches working with U18’s)
C5.10

Job Description (DSW Board Welfare Lead)

Role description for the DSW Board Welfare Champion
C5.11

Self-Disclosure Form
Form to be completed by the individual being employed/deployed. This needs to be completed prior to receipt of the DBS check certificate.


Section 6 - Important Contacts

Disability Sport Wales

Address: Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens Cardiff. CF11 9SW
Tel: 02920 334919
email: welfare@disabilitysportwales.com

 

Childline UK

https://www.childline.org.uk/
Helpline: 0800 1111

  

Disclosure and Barring Services

Website: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/disclosure-and-barring-service
Email: customerservices@dbs.gov.uk
DBS helpline: 03000 200 190
Minicom: 03000 200 192
Cymraeg: 03000 200 191
Address: DBS Customer Services, PO Box 3961, Royal Wootton Bassett, SN4 4HF United Kingdom

 

NSPCC Child Protection Helpline

Website: www.nspcc.org.uk
Helpline: 0808 800 5000
Deaf User’s Textphone: 18001 0808 800 5000

 

NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit (Wales)

Website: www.thecpsu.org.uk
Tel:  0116 366 5580 
Email: cpsu@nspcc.org.uk
X (formerly Twitter): @TheCPSU
Address: Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens, Cardiff, CF11 9SW

 

Children's Services Contact Details

Website: https://www.adss.cymru/

 

Police Authorities of Wales Contact Details

Website: http://www.police.uk/forces/

If you have an immediate concern about safety or welfare of a (disabled) child or young person, and you need to call the police, telephone the emergency number 999.

 

Local Safeguarding Children Board Contact Details

Website: ​​​​​​​https://safeguarding.wales/

 


Directory of Appendices

Appendix Content
C1.1

Template Policy Statement
A template for clubs and organisations affiliated to Disability Sport Wales to use in creating a Child Welfare and Safeguarding Policy

C2.1

Coaches Code of Conduct
Coaches Code of Conduct (Easy Read)
Outline of the ethical framework which a DSW Coach agree to abide by.

C2.2

Athletes Code of Conduct
Athletes Code of Conduct (Easy Read)
Outline of the ethical framework which a DSW Athlete agrees to abide by.

C2.3

Parents/Carers/Guardians Code of Conduct
Parents/Carers/Guardians Code of Conduct(Easy Read)
Outline of the ethical framework which a Parent/Carer/Guardian of a DSW athlete agrees to abide by.

C2.4

Guidelines for Transporting Children and Young People
DSW recommendations for good practice when transporting children and young people.

C2.5

Parental Consent Form: Transporting Children and Young People
Consent Form for parents to sign agreeing to the transportation of child.

C2.6

Guidelines for the Supervision of Children and Young People
DSW recommendations for good practice when supervising children and young people.

C2.7

Guidelines for Photography and Recorded Images  
DSW recommendations for good practice when taking and using photographs and recorded
images of children and young people.

C2.8

Parental Consent Form: Use of Photography and Recorded Image 
Consent Form for parents to sign agreeing to the taking and use of photographs and recorded images of their child.

C2.9

Guidelines for Club Promotion through the DSW website ​​​​​​
DSW recommendations for good practice when promoting clubs for children and young people on the DSW website.

C2.10

 DSW’s Commitment to e-safety: Using Social Media and Information Technology
DSW position statement regarding e-safety and the role e-communication has within the
organisation.

C2.11

Athlete Agreement: Use of Social Media
Agreement Form for DSW athletes to sign agreeing to standards for the use of social media.

C2.12

Officers Agreement: Use of Social Media
Agreement Form for DSW Officers (coaches, volunteers or others in a position of trust) to sign agreeing to standards for the use of social media.

C2.13

Guidelines for manual handling/ supporting athlete transfer
DSW recommendations for good practice when supporting an athlete transferring or recovering into a specific piece of equipment used within the pursuit of their sport.

C3.1

About the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)
Information about the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

C3.2

DSW Disclosure and Barring Service Processes
Outline of the DSW process for conducting DBS checks with staff and/or volunteers

C3.3

Guidance about Regulated Activity for Children
DBS recommendations about what is considered to be ‘Regulated Activity’

C3.4

Guidance about Eligibility for a DBS Enhanced Check
DBS recommendations about who is eligible for a DBS check

C3.5

DSW List of Eligible Roles for DBS check
DSW recommendations for those roles which meet the eligibility requirements for a DBS check associated with Regulated Activity

C3.6

DSW Anti-Bullying Policy
DSW Policy to combat and prevent bullying

C4.1

Responding to concerns about individuals outside of DSW ​​​​​​
DSW process which MUST be followed if there are concerns that some OUTSIDE of DSW has abused or has been alleged to abuse a child or young person attending a DSW session.

C4.2

Responding to concerns about a member of DSW staff or volunteer 
DSW process which MUST be followed if there are concerns that a DSW member of staff or volunteer has abused or has been alleged to abuse a child or young person.

C4.3

Responding to concerns about an e-safety incident

DSW process which MUST be followed if there are concerns about an e-safety incident.
C4.4

DSW Internal Safeguarding Procedures: Risk Management Process

DSW process highlighting training requirement through to responding to an issue raised within the DBS check.
C4.5

DSW Internal Safeguarding Procedures: Responding to an allegation made about a Coach or Volunteer within a DSW session 

The process DSW will apply in responding to an allegation received through the DSW Lead Welfare Officer about a coach or volunteer involved with a DSW session.
C4.6

DSW Internal Safeguarding Procedures: Responding to an allegation made about an individual outside of a DSW session
The process DSW will apply in responding to an allegation received through the DSW Lead Welfare Officer about a individual who is not associated with a DSW session.

C4.7

DSW Incidents and Complaints Monitoring Process 

DSW process for monitoring incidents and complaints.
C4.8

Incident Report Form

Template form which outlines the key elements of information which should be provided or captured by an individual receiving a disclosure or allegation.
C4.9

e-Safety Incident Report Form
Template form which outlines the key elements of information which should be captured if there is an incident, or poor practice linked to e-technology or social media.

C4.10

Poor Practice Referral Form

Template form which outlines the key elements of information which needs to be identified if there is a suspicion or report of poor practice within the coaching environment or session.
C4.11

DSW Welfare Discipline and Dispute Resolutions Procedures (Officer)

Discipline and dispute resolution policy for those employed or deployed by DSW.
C4.12

DSW Welfare Discipline and Dispute Resolutions Procedures (Athlete)

Discipline and dispute resolution policy for athletes.
C4.13

DSW Welfare Lead Officer/DSW Safeguarding Panel Referral Form 
Template form to be completed by the DSW LWO or the Safeguarding Panel which records the key points of the DSW Safeguarding Panel discussion and identifies the chain of

communication on to appropriate individuals or bodies.
C4.14

DSW Whistle Blowing Policy

DSW Whistle Blowing Policy which can be evoked if an individual believes that a member of DSW staff is behaving inappropriately.
C4.15

Lead Officer Referral/Disclosure Report From

Form to be used by the DSW Lead or Associate Lead Welfare Officer when receiving information about referral or disclosure.
C4.16

Guidance for storing Welfare case or referral information

Information for Lead Welfare Officer regarding the processes for storing information which links to a Welfare case or referral, in accordance with Data Protection legislation.
C4.17

Making a Referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

Form created by the DBS for organisations who have a legal duty to refer an individual to the DBS.
C5.1

DSW Recruitment Process
Cyclical representation of the process DSW apply to recruitment

C5.2

DSW Recruitment Policy

This is DSW’s full Recruitment Policy
C5.3

DSW Application Form

This will receive if they request the opportunity to apply for a position with DSW
C5.4

DSW Reference Form

This will be sent out to the contact the candidate supplies as a reference for previous employment or who will attest to their character and suitability for the position applied for.
C5.5

Job Description – DSW Lead Welfare Officer 
Role description for the DSW Lead Welfare Officer

Job Description – DSW Associate Lead Welfare Officer

Role description for the DSW Associate Lead Welfare Officer
C5.6

Job Description – DSW DBS Countersignatory

Role description for individuals involved with countersigning DBS checks
C5.7

Job Description – DSW Head Coach

Role description for head coaches employed/deployed by DSW
C5.8

Job Description – DSW Assistant Coach / Leader

Role description for assistant coaches/leaders employed/deployed by DSW
C5.9

Job Description – DSW Head Junior Coach

Role description for head junior coaches employed/deployed by DSW (relevant to those coaches working with U18’s)
C5.10

Job Description (DSW Board Welfare Lead)

Role description for the DSW Board Welfare Champion
C5.11

Self-Disclosure Form
Form to be completed by the individual being employed/deployed. This needs to be completed prior to receipt of the DBS check certificate.

 

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